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trying a new food

Posted by on Oct 15, 2009 in Blog Posts |

I can’t even think of the last time I tried a truly novel food. OK, I had golden beets last year, but I was told they are just like red beets, but a different color.

So these were at my local coop, grown in Eagan Minnesota. It’s called a romanesque broccoli and it looks CRAZY. Its gorgeous and weird looking. I’ve never cooked it and felt some actual mild anxiety at the store. “What if I buy this and I don’t like it? What if M doesn’t like it? Will I waste the money if we don’t eat it?”
It was interesting to put myself in my daughter’s place. She is expected to try new foods all the time, and for the most part she does. It reinforced how much she has to trust me as the provider to try new foods. I think about many of the parents I see at workshops who say they are “picky eaters” too. They share their stories of being forced to eat everything on their plates as children and other experiences that turned them off to trying new foods.
buying and preparing new or novel foods for the picky eater (parents too!)

1) Don’t be afraid, make it fun
2) ask the produce guy or gal: What does this taste like? Is there a good way to cook this?
3) look up recipes online. Add sauces, fat and flavor. Maybe make it with a sauce you really like.
4) don’t pressure yourself to try it. Prepare it, smell it, look at it, maybe taste a little (yes, you are allowed to spit it out) Remember, pressuring kids to eat backfires, don’t pressure yourself either.
5) try to buy a small amount at first if money/waste is a concern
6) prepare another familiar food with the new food so you can have something to eat. Maybe peas or a salad with it, or a favorite pasta dish so you have something to look forward to.
7) try it again a different way
Good luck!
I’ll let you know how it goes. I can’t wait to show M this cook new veggie.
I challenge my readers to try a new food and let me know how you felt about it!
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